Roaster Pathway Level 2


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Roaster Pathway Level 2 will examine topics ranging from sustainability and business to culinary science and sensory analysis. Students will also travel to a coffee producing country, visiting farms and meeting producers to further deepen the connection to craft with real-world perspectives.

Roaster Pathway Level 2 graduates will leave the program with a depth of insight and experience necessary to innovate and lead in specialty coffee.

Duration: 30 hours – up to 15 hours may be completed online.

Requirements

Espresso and Milk Steaming Fundamentals Part 1

Exceptional espresso preparation is a requirement for anyone in specialty coffee retail. Students work closely with station instructors in small groups, pulling shots, steaming milk and preparing espresso beverages in this laboratory-style class. CP101  is designed to enable students to:

  • Discuss SCAA espresso standards and current industry trends for established retailers and baristas
  • Demystify espresso machines, grinders, and espresso preparation techniques for beginners
  • Provide hands-on experience under guidance from SCAA Instructors to prepare espresso, milk, and café drinks
  • Administer preventive maintenance to espresso equipment, including essential basic cleaning steps
  • Explain the importance of workstation cleanliness Introduction to Espresso. In Part 1 (CP101) During the overview lecture, students learn the essential elements of a quality espresso; then, in small groups participants craft espresso using SCAA protocols

Please note: This is the first half of a 6-hour class and both parts must be taken the same day (there is a 90 minute break).

Espresso and Milk Steaming Fundamentals Part 2

Exceptional espresso preparation is a requirement for anyone in specialty coffee retail. Students work closely with station instructors in small groups, pulling shots, steaming milk and preparing espresso beverages in this laboratory-style class. CP102  is designed to enable students to:

  • Discuss SCAA espresso standards and current industry trends for established retailers and baristas
  • Demystify espresso machines, grinders, and espresso preparation techniques for beginners
  • Provide hands-on experience under guidance from SCAA Instructors to prepare espresso, milk, and café drinks
  • Administer preventive maintenance to espresso equipment, including essential basic cleaning steps
  • Explain the importance of workstation cleanliness Introduction to Espresso. In Part 1 (CP101) During the overview lecture, students learn the essential elements of a quality espresso; then, in small groups participants craft espresso using SCAA protocols

Please note: This is the second half of a 6-hour class and both parts must be taken the same day (there is a 90 minute break).

Introduction to Sensory Analysis

Sensory Analysis is a field that traverses industries. Individuals in the field of coffee tasting or cupping must employ techniques of the field of sensory analysis by nature, since any coffee must first undergo sensory analysis to be defined as “specialty”. The quality of the sensory information can affect the quality of business decisions.  Understanding the broader scope of Sensory Analysis, students will be challenged to develop widely used guidelines, prepare scientific tests, and approach analyzing coffee in commonly accepted formats. Being offered a window into the larger world of sensory analysis, some students may be intrigued to go deeper in this tract toward further sensory analysis studies.    Individual differences and bias are touched on in this class, but covered more in depth in advanced grading and evaluation classes.

SCAA Cupping Form & Peer Calibration

The SCAA Cupping Form was developed specifically to score quality coffees. This class demystifies this seemingly complex form and prepares students to embrace its regular use.  After an instructive lecture, students cup three coffees, score them, and calibrate to experienced instructors. Open discussion and active participation is the driving force as students align on the methods and concepts used to evaluate coffee. This class is recommended as a training class for coffee professionals interested in preparing for the SCAA/CQI Q-Grader Test.

Defect Cupping

Using the SCAA Cupping Protocols and alternating between direct, small group cuppings, brief lectures and small group discussions, students will evaluate two flights of coffee.  Students will identify coffees containing five specific defects & speculate to their causes:  Rioy, Ferment, woody/aged, unripe and musty/moldy. This class is recommended for coffee professionals interested in preparing for the CQI Q-Grader Test.  Q-graders apply this toward their fast-track Coffee Taster Level 1.

Recommended Prerequisites: CB200, RP206, RP207, GE151
Required Prerequisites: CB100, CP151, CP152, GE103, GE201

Grinding and Grind Analysis

Correct coffee grinding is an essential function of cup quality in specialty coffee.  Students will discuss essential elements of grinding and taste coffee brewed to highlight the importance of proper grinding. Students use processes and procedures for measuring coffee grinds/particle size and watch a demonstration of grinding analysis equipment.  Students also discuss the business case and essential elements of good grinding practices.

Taste Testing for Production

Errors occur in production facilities regularly, and this class helps those who work in quality control identify errors and make decisions appropriate to their companies.  Inconsistencies in saleable goods may be grounds for losing customer base and this class reviews some of the most prevalent inconsistencies in coffee processing and production, along with options for use of inconsistent product for sale.  Focusing on sensory analysis difference testing, learners will evaluate finished goods to determine impact on customer loyalty.  This skill will assist coffee processors, producers, roasters, and baristas by increasing their awareness of the consistency of their finished product, using the SCAA standard protocol for evaluating finished product-roasted coffee.  This is not a cupping class for green coffee evaluation; rather, students analyze the sensory impact of  three important production issues and decision-making when these occur:  incorrect coffee/blend, incorrect grind, incorrect roast level.  It is a fast-paced tasting class and not recommended for novices or beginning cuppers or roasters.

Coffee Tasters Flavor Wheel

The SCAA Coffee Tasters Flavor Wheel is a tool designed for professional coffee cuppers that defines common industry terminology used in the sensory evaluation of coffee.  The wheel offers insight into how those characteristics develop and gives specialty coffee professionals the tools to articulate sensory experiences.  This class succinctly illuminates the development and theory behind the wheel and delves into the right half of the right wheel.  The class begins with distinguishing the aroma categories and culminates with an activity with 9 representative coffee samples that demonstrate tastes on the Flavor Wheel.

Coffee Farming: Digging Deeper than Seed to Cup

In order to communicate quality throughout the coffee chain (producer through consumer), having a basic knowledge of the production of coffee is essential. RP206 Coffee Farming and RP207 Coffee Processing are designed to enable Roasters, Baristas and Cuppers to discuss coffee (green, roasted, and brewed) from an agricultural, horticultural and milling perspective. The classes aim to introduce basic farming  information to help enhance purchasing decisions and promote specialty coffee to consumers. Participants will learn vocabulary, concepts and mental models to support communication and understanding between all members of the supply chain.  Material for this class can alternatively be presented in a coffee-producing country with on-site examples as part of a Roasters Guild Origin Trip.

This class is for Cuppers, Roasters and Baristas and is not intended as a preparatory class for farmers.

Coffee Processing Methods

This class  introduces basic and processing information to help enhance purchasing decisions and promote specialty coffee to consumers. Videos and diagrams are used to demystify processing methods and allow for competence in explaining washed, semi-washed and dry processes simply to others.

Identifying Defects in Roasting

Roasting is all about applying heat to green beans to produce a quality roasted coffee. A general understanding of the types of heat and how they apply to roasting is essential for any coffee roaster. The relationship of energy conversion between heat and mechanical systems, is extremely relevant for operators of roasting equipment, for purposes of safety and for managing variables to produce predictable results. This class presents the fundamentals and encourages learners to apply concepts to their own roasting operations. Learners participate in heat transfer demonstrations and taste the same coffee roasted to the same profile from 3 roasters of different materials and drum thicknesses.

Heat and the Roasting Machine

This class presents the fundamentals of understanding the recording of temperature, and the control of heat application and transfer in a batch roaster. In essence roasting is applying heat to green coffee in a thought out and controlled manner in order to produce the desired chemical and physical changes. Understanding how temperature is recorded and how heat transfer works in a roasting system is essential for not only safety, but being able to control the roast. This class is designed to enable participants to:

• Explain principles of heat and how they are noticeable in the roasting process

• Explain each part of the coffee roasting machine and how heat is applied, controlled or lost

Required Prerequisites: CB100, CP151, CP152, GE103, RP112, RP120

Espresso Roasting

Roasting espresso involves different techniques and approaches than roasting for other brew methods. Participants will produce three different espresso roasts and evaluate them both within the class (which is necessary for learning purposes, albeit by industry standards is not ideal for espresso) and when they return to their workplaces.

Recommended Prerequisites: CP101, CP102

Coffee Packaging Fundamentals

This class will outline and detail the various types of packaging equipment used for roasted coffee, as well and the dynamics of packaging materials. The class is organized to address three main factors of packaging: product conveyance,  consumer convenience and preservation of freshness. Specifically, class objective are to:

• List the main types of barrier materials used for coffee packaging.

• Discuss staling factors in coffee and factors when choosing packaging materials.

• Describe the various valves and seals on the market.

Air Quality and the Roaster

Air quality has become an important issue to coffee roasters around the country. This class will cover the types of air quality equipment that are currently on the market, the way that each piece of equipment works, basic ideas on the set up of that type of equipment, air quality measured from each device, and fuel conservation issues. It will also help point roasters in the direction to find state regulations that may apply to them. Topics include: Financial (Startup, Regulatory, Fines, Energy), Environmental awareness & stewardship and Zoning.

Recommended Prerequisites: RP208, CB205

Required Prerequisites: RP110, RP112

Roaster Level 2 Written Exam

This written exam covers the knowledge aspects of the Roaster Pathway Level 2 classes.

Classes marked with * are NOT required for Licensed Q-Graders. Q-Graders also earn credit for GE103: Orientation to SCAA Cupping in the Foundations of Coffee Pathway, but must complete all other classes.